A1 or Z9

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Snapshot2020

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I too could have went with either body. In June I had the opportunity from a Sony A1 user while photographing Bald Eagles to look through the viewfinder, track Eagles in flight and do a 20 shot burst from his A1. I was very much in awe with what the Sony A1 has to offer for Raptor Photography. Meanwhile that day I walked away with a number of nice Photos of Eagles in flight with my D850 / 500 PF but that opportunity to handle the A1 really got me to thinking about switching brands. Since 2006 with my first Nikon DSLR purchase and 6 bodies since I decided to stay with Nikon. Today I completed the NPS Member priority shipping form with my purchase number thru a Nikon Dealer. Will the Z9 meet my Raptor / BIF satisfaction, that’s to be determined and owning the Z7ii in part has prepared me for the Z9’s menu system.
Come next June when I’m standing nearby the photographers that paid for Mark Smith’s Eagle Photography workshop in Washington State I’m sure there will be a few Z9 users in his group that will readily share some thoughts about the Z9 pros and cons.
 

StefanSC

Active member
Good photography is easy to buy. Buy the latest and greatest camera and lenses with all out automation, buy some solid software with AI in it's name and buy some tickets to the workshops of famous photographers. Unless you are completely brain-dead, you will come out of it with good photography.

It won't be good value for money photography and it won't be standout photography but it will be good photography.

The trouble is when you want to make great photos. Then you need to work extra hard to stand out from all the good photos that people can take with their wallets ;).
 

O

Well-known member
Good photography is easy to buy. Buy the latest and greatest camera and lenses with all out automation, buy some solid software with AI in it's name and buy some tickets to the workshops of famous photographers. Unless you are completely brain-dead, you will come out of it with good photography.

It won't be good value for money photography and it won't be standout photography but it will be good photography.

The trouble is when you want to make great photos. Then you need to work extra hard to stand out from all the good photos that people can take with their wallets ;).

I like the way you have answered the point, really, thank you.......

What you have said is true and its the modern day way of unskilled shooters being able to do what a true artistc pro photographer used to be able to do, thanks to technology skill sets are becoming far less needed.............or becomming some what obsolete...........

Photography manufactures have advanced with the technology enough to have the gear in novice hands deliver stunning technical results..........that's their future market......

So yes you can buy can good technical documentary photography, but if you don't have the eye, the imagination, the ability to use light and subjects to evoke emotion or a connection for the viewer, you end up mostly being a technical document er or recorder with no real skill sets....the use of a high tech camera, and use creative software coupled with plagiarizing variants makes one usually more a graphic designer............and that has it place and seems the future in many ways for a lot of people.

So take away all the tech gear and software, give some one a D2h D3X D300 and a kit lens or 150-500 Sigma .......and see where they end up with BIF action shots in a variety of conditions would be a fun example LOL
I mean do driver less cars make one a good driver LOL

Interesting fun subject........i am not always right........
 

O

Well-known member
Good photography is easy to buy. Buy the latest and greatest camera and lenses with all out automation, buy some solid software with AI in it's name and buy some tickets to the workshops of famous photographers. Unless you are completely brain-dead, you will come out of it with good photography.

It won't be good value for money photography and it won't be standout photography but it will be good photography.

The trouble is when you want to make great photos. Then you need to work extra hard to stand out from all the good photos that people can take with their wallets ;).

In addition...........

Do driver less cars make you a better drive, no they just make you a passenger..........LOL

Do these fully auto cameras make you a better photographer, with the super fast frame rates and focus tracking.......are you closer to being a video graph-er or just a recorder document-er, then using your computer processing and editing skills to graphically create the image you want, is that art or creative photography or graphic design.........interesting cross roads.......i could be off with the fairy's ...........or may be not.........

Only an opinion as allways
 

dtibbals

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Here’s the thing when saying a camera does or does not make someone a better photographer. Gear makes a good photographer better it does not make a bad photographer better in most cases. If you don’t understand composition, exposure, depth of field and aren’t willing to capture your subjects in their best such as not wanting to get on the ground to be eye level than no camera is going to fix that. If it’s the better af helps you gain more keepers and makes up for lack of skill than it does make you better. Better is subjective, better could still mean you produce crap.

I had to laugh a few weeks ago while out shooting birds a guy came up to look at my big white lens and introduce himself. He apparently visits this location daily and it was my first visit. He invited me to join his Facebook group on this location so I did. He continued to describe himself as an advanced amateur and pointed towards some others and mentioned they weren’t. I smiled and continued on with my day. After viewing members post 99% of it I wouldn’t share including his as they really need to read Steve’s books. Comparing my photography to theirs I look like a pro, comparing my stuff to some of Steve’s and I look like a newbie lol. So ones skill level matters first and than gear. Gear can only do so much.
 

O

Well-known member
Here’s the thing when saying a camera does or does not make someone a better photographer. Gear makes a good photographer better it does not make a bad photographer better in most cases. If you don’t understand composition, exposure, depth of field and aren’t willing to capture your subjects in their best such as not wanting to get on the ground to be eye level than no camera is going to fix that. If it’s the better af helps you gain more keepers and makes up for lack of skill than it does make you better. Better is subjective, better could still mean you produce crap.

I had to laugh a few weeks ago while out shooting birds a guy came up to look at my big white lens and introduce himself. He apparently visits this location daily and it was my first visit. He invited me to join his Facebook group on this location so I did. He continued to describe himself as an advanced amateur and pointed towards some others and mentioned they weren’t. I smiled and continued on with my day. After viewing members post 99% of it I wouldn’t share including his as they really need to read Steve’s books. Comparing my photography to theirs I look like a pro, comparing my stuff to some of Steve’s and I look like a newbie lol. So ones skill level matters first and than gear. Gear can only do so much.
I like it.....

For top pros the camera represents around 10% of the result, for beginners the camera dose most of the work........

In motor cross we found a C grader/beginner relies on the motor bike 90% an A Grader rely,s on the bike 10%.............

My girl friend a non photographer was given for a moment an A1 with 100-400.....in full tracking mode from my mate on the beach, she asked him am i holding it right and where is the button i push, my Sony mate showed her how to hold it and push the shutter.........she took gulls and pelicans flying some people all on the beach, she didn't even review the images, she gave the camera back saying thank you, but that's boring, she picked up her surfboard and said i am for a few waves.........the images she took unbeknownst were brilliant just needed cropping etc but awesome........that night i told her about her great technical shots, she said i don't know what you guys see in it all........

Interesting what technology is doing for the consumer...........
 

zule11

Member
Nikon Z9 is DPReviews PRODUCT OF THE YEAR winner.

Also, Nikon Z9 is runner up for HIGH-END camera (winner Sony A1) but (mainly) for following reason: "the Z9 is shaping up to be one of – if not the - best high-end ILCs we've ever seen. It's only the fact of its DSLR-like size and weight which just prevent it from taking the top award. "

 
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FB101

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Here’s the thing when saying a camera does or does not make someone a better photographer. Gear makes a good photographer better it does not make a bad photographer better in most cases. If you don’t understand composition, exposure, depth of field and aren’t willing to capture your subjects in their best such as not wanting to get on the ground to be eye level than no camera is going to fix that. If it’s the better af helps you gain more keepers and makes up for lack of skill than it does make you better. Better is subjective, better could still mean you produce crap.

I had to laugh a few weeks ago while out shooting birds a guy came up to look at my big white lens and introduce himself. He apparently visits this location daily and it was my first visit. He invited me to join his Facebook group on this location so I did. He continued to describe himself as an advanced amateur and pointed towards some others and mentioned they weren’t. I smiled and continued on with my day. After viewing members post 99% of it I wouldn’t share including his as they really need to read Steve’s books. Comparing my photography to theirs I look like a pro, comparing my stuff to some of Steve’s and I look like a newbie lol. So ones skill level matters first and than gear. Gear can only do so much.
In the world of bird photography there are really two crowds - they are often confounded because we all take pictures of birds but really, the goal is quite different.
The first group is above all else loving birds, and their pictures document (often beautifully) an encounter, a species, a behavior - for that group, the documentation of nature is paramount even if at times the technique is left behind. To be honest, an R5 with that crazy 800 f:11 lens is a dream come true for that endeavor - results can be awesome but the reach achieved for the $ is second to none.

The second group loves nature and being in nature as much, but the goal is to create the most beautiful picture of an event as possible. I am in that group, and I may have thousands of images that document interesting moments (to me) but they'll rarely get posted because the light isn't right, a stick is in the wrong place, focus isn't tack sharp etc... ( i do post some of those here because there are real bird experts that can help with identification when Merlin fails me or to illustrate a point about equipment but most of them are only seen by me)

One pursuit is not more noble or more valuable than the other, it's all about what gives us the greatest joy and some folks excel at both and those I admire greatly.
 

O

Well-known member
Best wildlife photographers I know are well planted in both crowds... they love and know a lot about their subjects and this allows them to create those shots that move people and make them go "uuuh and aaaaah".
And that's what i mean you cant just buy good photography, you have to learn that with practice practice practice and with that comes knowledge and the aahaa
 
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