Don’t you hate it when….

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geoawelch

Member
Supporting Member
…you have a flock of geese flying over and crank up your shutter speed to 1/2500 or higher to catch them in flight and then forget to change it back when you resume your Warbler photography?


Any oops moments you care to share?

Cheers,

George
 

Squatch

Active member
Supporting Member
Not really an “oops” on my part, but... I hate it when I’m at a nature preserve (or wildlife refuge, or wherever), actively taking photos of -insert bird or animal name here- and someone walking by on a trail has to stop and loudly proclaim, “Wow, look at that camera! What are you taking pictures of?”...and scares off whatever bird or animal I was shooting at the time. I’m sure most of you have felt this pain.
 

FB101

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Back in the day when I shot street photography with a rangefinder the biggest “oops” was leaving the cap on the lens... in film days that hurt.
Now, like everyone else, leaving the camera in wrong speed, wrong expo compensation are the most common.
The other one I kick myself for all the time is leaving the camera on 2 second self timer delay after shooting landscape on a tripod... of course the next time you use the camera is with a rare bird and requires quick action.
i also leave the focus limiter on the close up range after shooting butterflies which invariably ruins the next BIF opportunity.

So yes, I have issues but I am getting help - I read Steve‘s books :)
 

FB101

Well-known member
Supporting Member
This happens to me more often than it should and sadly, I’m using mirrorless so I should spot it right away. At least it’s normally only 1/3 or 2/3 stop so easily corrected. Just did it yesterday again.
Thank god for modern sensors, they are quite forgiving.
White egrets are my nemesis though; I usually have +1/3 to +2/3 dialed in to push the histogram to the right with most birds but if I don’t dial -2/3 instead for white egrets in front of greenery, they are unrecoverable and I make that mistake all the time.
 

NorthernFocus

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Simple solution is to shoot all manual settings all the time. Then you're in the habit of paying attention to them every time you put your eye to the VF. That said I have started using auto ISO now and then and sometimes forget to switch back and ruin a BIF exposure.
 

abc123brian

Well-known member
Simple solution is to shoot all manual settings all the time. Then you're in the habit of paying attention to them every time you put your eye to the VF. That said I have started using auto ISO now and then and sometimes forget to switch back and ruin a BIF exposure.
The funny thing is I used to shoot full manual with my Canon gear and started to move to manual with auto iso with Fujifilm, then later started using Aperture and Shutter Priority modes. The Auto Exposure is so good, I don‘t use manual very often anymore.
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
Not really an “oops” on my part, but... I hate it when I’m at a nature preserve (or wildlife refuge, or wherever), actively taking photos of -insert bird or animal name here- and someone walking by on a trail has to stop and loudly proclaim, “Wow, look at that camera! What are you taking pictures of?”...and scares off whatever bird or animal I was shooting at the time. I’m sure most of you have felt this pain.
I'm going to start selling shirts with "Yes, it is a big lens" printed on the back of them :)
 

Whiskeyman

Well-known member
I'm going to start selling shirts with "Yes, it is a big lens" printed on the back of them :)
How about "I know I have a nice camera."


And I just hate it when I get to a location and find out that I have no memory cards with me. (Now I carry some in every camera bag I own, as well as always keeping a "fresh formatted" card in every camera.) So now I have to remember to fully charge my batteries before I go out with my camera, because I'd hate to get out to a location only to find out that my batteries were uncharged!
 
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ssheipel

Well-known member
I hate it when I dial in an exposure compensation, then forget to get it change it back.
This is mine, too. Luckily I only forget to switch back only EVERY time I use exposure comp. In fact I'm going to go check my camera now and I bet I finished yesterday's shoot with e.p., now remembering I played with it a bit at the start of the shoot LOL
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Not really an “oops” on my part, but... I hate it when I’m at a nature preserve (or wildlife refuge, or wherever), actively taking photos of -insert bird or animal name here- and someone walking by on a trail has to stop and loudly proclaim, “Wow, look at that camera! What are you taking pictures of?”...and scares off whatever bird or animal I was shooting at the time. I’m sure most of you have felt this pain.
Literally last evening that happened (again) to me, though this time the loud talker then proclaimed, "Oh I hope he got a shot of them flying!" She then stopped asked what kind of camera. I said Nikon. She says, "No, WHAT kind of camera." I say D6. She says, "Never heard of it." and they move on. Damn, people! LOL
 

Snapshot2020

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I'm out alone, quietly enjoying watching and photographing wildlife, when all of a sudden I'm spotted, and 10 other "photographers" crowd my space and start chattering among themselves. That kills it for me, and I usually leave.
Then you should never pull over alongside the Hwy get out of your car with a Camera while inside GTNP, Yellowstone, or Glacier as you will eventually have a several mile back up. 😃
 

Woodyg3

Well-known member
Supporting Member
One time I accidentally shot a whole day outside with florescent lighting set on my white balance.
 

Karl

Active member
…you have a flock of geese flying over and crank up your shutter speed to 1/2500 or higher to catch them in flight and then forget to change it back when you resume your Warbler photography?


Any oops moments you care to share?

Cheers,

George
No problem for me... I have a button set for BIF against the sky, another set for BIF against trees, etc. and each case has SS, and exposure compensation included... very fast and almost brainless.
 

Tiago Cardoso

Active member
No problem for me... I have a button set for BIF against the sky, another set for BIF against trees, etc. and each case has SS, and exposure compensation included... very fast and almost brainless.
I'm not sure I've ever owned a camera that can do that but I've thought of that kind of idea many times. What camera do you use?
 
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