Don’t you hate it when….

If you would like to post, you'll need to register. Note that if you have a BCG store account, you'll need a new, separate account here (we keep the two sites separate for security purposes).

Andy Work

Well-known member
Supporting Member
....forget to make sure the tag end of your film engaged by seeing whether or not the rewind lever spins.

Ah - the film days

I was a Snap On Tools dealer in a former life. Several of us took a trip to the Mount Carmel Il plant for a tour. I took some awesome pictures of all kinds of machining operations, chrome plating, hand fitting of pliers joints, etc. These were going to be awesome.

Even though I knew to check that the film was engaged, I didn't this time. It wasn't.
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
No problem for me... I have a button set for BIF against the sky, another set for BIF against trees, etc. and each case has SS, and exposure compensation included... very fast and almost brainless.
I'm so impressed when people use the user menu functions., truly! I've been meaning to get around to it since the D3 :)
 

Icarus

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Think I've done all of the above at least once, usually many many times. One thing I've figured out is when some talkative soul comes up and admires my camera/lens, whatever, I just agree with them "Yes, it is." That sort of ends the conversation without being overly rude. :)
 

Tom Reynolds

Active member
Supporting Member
Shooting the Eclipse I forgot to take the filter off when the eclipse occurred. So, of course I broke the cardinal rule of eclipse viewing (Thou shalt always watch the entire eclipse) and spent a min (60 sec of a 120 sec eclipse) screwing around trying to find the problem.
Tom
 

Snapshot2020

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Chartered a flight for two visiting relatives when I lived in Vancouver Washington to fly up to Mt St Helens 6 months after the Eruption to photograph the Mountain and the Blast Zone. The film I used for my Canon AE 1 was expired and came back after processing with a note on the cartridge along with the 36 blank prints. Learned a lesson that day, always check the expiration date on the Kodak Film Container before you purchase or before you load the Camera. Embarrassing when I had to ask my relatives for some copies of their photos.
 

NorthernFocus

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Or when some self rightious person angrily demands to know "how are those pictures being used"......
I've not had that one happen. But my likely response would be wildlife pornography. Let them go figure that out.
 

FB101

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I'm not sure I've ever owned a camera that can do that but I've thought of that kind of idea many times. What camera do you use?
Most newer Sony (A9, A9ii, A7R4, A1) - you can store a completely new camera configuration with one recall button (pretty much any button)- you hold it down and you have a "perched bird" set-up and you let go, it reverts back to your normal settings ready for the bird to take-off. Or different types of backgrounds. Or... whatever tickles your fancy.
I am looking forward to trying that ability and see how seamless it goes.
 

Robin

Well-known member
Slightly off topic.
Photographer standing with camera and 600mm lens on tripod, photographing over heathland.
Up walks second photographer, what are you photographing? reply Dartford Warbler
Oh I can’t see one says the second guy, it’s just dropped down, I’m waiting for it to pop back up.
I’ve never seen a Dartford Warbler before, says the second guy, there it is now !
I can’t see it , as first guy hits the shutter .
So where is the best place to photograph Dartford Warbler then, asks the second guy.
.........About 50 yards down that way!
 

Robin

Well-known member
I had pre focused on a perch of a set-up waiting for a Azure-winged Magpie to land.
Using back button focus normally and without a remote, all I had to do was press the shutter.
As the bird landed I automatically pressed Bbutton and shutter ....best blurred photographs of Azure-winged Magpie!
 

ingweDave

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I had pre focused on a perch of a set-up waiting for a Azure-winged Magpie to land.
Using back button focus normally and without a remote, all I had to do was press the shutter.
As the bird landed I automatically pressed Bbutton and shutter ....best blurred photographs of Azure-winged Magpie!
I have a friend that did exactly the same thing🤣
 

Midnight Wolf

New member
For a few months now, I've been trying to photograph a coyote pack that lives in the nature preserve near me. It never fails that I head down one side of a loop and about the center of the loop I run across someone who sees the camera, "OH! Did you see the coyotes? They are back behind us." It never fails that by the time I get there the pack has left. I never seem to pick the right side of the trails!
 

Niels.hr.Hansen

Active member
Can't decide what forgotten setting I dislike the most. White balance, metering area, exp. compensation with a little luck you notice it when chimping else additional work at home and potential ruined shots. Setting the lens focus limiter and you think the lens is broken because it won't focus, when you get to flicking the switch the subject is long gone.
 

Niels.hr.Hansen

Active member
For a few months now, I've been trying to photograph a coyote pack that lives in the nature preserve near me. It never fails that I head down one side of a loop and about the center of the loop I run across someone who sees the camera, "OH! Did you see the coyotes? They are back behind us." It never fails that by the time I get there the pack has left. I never seem to pick the right side of the trails!
Yes most animals has a sense of camera proximity, that can make them vanish ;)
 

jeffnles1

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Something even more important than exposure settings when a flock of geese fly over is to remember to keep your mouth closed. Don't ask m how I know these things. At least I was wearing a hat which prevented the worst of the tragedy. Let's just leave it at that and move on. :)
 

Icarus

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Absolutely. Carry a camera underwater. If a shark investigates you, try to photograph it. Shark gone....
Birds at least notice the lens. When shooting Condors at the Grand Canyon using a 300 2.8 lens I have many pictures of them flying by gawking at the lens to the point of looking back behind them. I've often wondered if lenses were rectangular instead of a big round eye if they'd pay less attention to it.
 

Letolen

Active member
All the population problemS, I feel for you.
I live on private property & no one to distribute anything. Even when I do go out. Rarely anyone comes near me.
I am very scary🤣
So have a habit of forgetting to click back into continuous.
 
Top