Focus Shift Shooting

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jbarton248

New member
Steve, if I'm shooting Canon 1 DX2's will this presentation of yours be beneficial to me, since Canon doesn't have Focus Shift built in? I usually use live view and move the focus box around.
 

EricBowles

Member
The clear answer is yes - it will be a lot of benefit.

Focus shift shooting is simply a tool to accomplish something that can be done in other ways. Steve's series covers a lot of these techniques. You can adjust focus manually, use a focus rail, or even move the camera manually. While moving the camera manually takes some practice, that's how Don Komarechka makes his exquisite snowflake images. https://www.donkom.ca/

The other aspect of focus shift shooting is knowing how to process your images. Steves videos demonstrate multiple methods and talk through pros and cons of different techniques.

The idea of focus shift controls in a camera is based on automating a range of manual options. The ideas are similar - where do you start, how large a step, how many steps, and where does it end.

I would suggest that you consider alternatives to moving the AF box. That works for some subjects, but any automated AF method requires a good AF target, and if you are moving across an angled or irregular surface, you probably can't control exactly where your camera focuses with an automated mode. It might work for landscapes, but be more of a challenge for some macro and close up subjects.
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
As Eric says, there's probably a lot in the course that will help. However, I have to sell it as a Focus Shift Shooting course since that's the method used - otherwise the uproar would be crazy.

As Eric also says, you can manually stack - I used to do it all the time. Manual stacking isn't covered in the course, but much of the course still applies to it, both in the field and all of the post processing.

Another thought is that I believe some of the Canon mirrorless now have a similar feature. Again, the course won't match it exactly, but you can probably adapt much of the info :)
 

JAS

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I have a Z6 with focus shift and I use some older lenses on my D750 and do the manual focus point selection. The biggest benefit I got from the course was on how to handle your images within the stacking software and processing steps. Truly worth the time and the minor cost.
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
I have a Z6 with focus shift and I use some older lenses on my D750 and do the manual focus point selection. The biggest benefit I got from the course was on how to handle your images within the stacking software and processing steps. Truly worth the time and the minor cost.
Thanks so much - I'm really glad it helped :)
 

JAS

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thanks so much - I'm really glad it helped :)
You are welcome. This was a worthwhile investment as are your books. Your speaking, teaching and writing style are understandable. well-spoken and easy to follow. The course format with the main and added features are easy to watch and a good length for leatnning. Your books are practical and easy to read. You are one of three pros whose stuff really works for me. Keep it up.
 

Hut

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Supporting Member
OK I am just a big dummy. I manually grab frames then use the automatic stacking function in PS. My problem is dealing with movement of clouds, leaves and critters. I assume this will teach me how to deal with these issues also?
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
OK I am just a big dummy. I manually grab frames then use the automatic stacking function in PS. My problem is dealing with movement of clouds, leaves and critters. I assume this will teach me how to deal with these issues also?
We do talk about it and once nice thing with Focus Shift Shooting as opposed to doing it manually is that the automated system can get it done in seconds - so it minimizes the problem of movement in a lot of cases (not every case, but I use it in situations where I never would have tried manual stacking).
 
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Hut

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Supporting Member
We do talk about it and once nice thing with Focus Shift Shooting as opposed to doing it manually is that the automated system can get it done in seconds - so it minimizes the problem of movement in a lot of cases (not every case, but I use it in situations where I never would have tried manual stacking).
Ok great I am very interested in focus shift shooting and will be taking this on as time permits. I am getting back to work after being off for months and it is killing me....lol
 
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