Some backpack suggestions required after my bad experience (I am not proud of myself!)

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Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
When I am hicking with my 500 PF mounted on my D500, I use an old Vanguard photo backpack; two weeks ago, it was the case but I forgot my headlamp in the small pocket at the top of the bag; my camera was very tight in it but I didn't pay attention to it; on my way, I took the opportunity to take some photos of mushrooms with my cell phone at ground level, without getting rid of my backpack; once arrived, I discovered my camera completely separated of the lens:mad:; I uderstood later that the pressure of the headlamp on the camera was the cause of the breakage. My equipment has been sent to Nikon Canada...2 000 US $ for repairs:mad: Do you have any suggestions of backpacks allowing me to get out easily and quickly my camera and it's lens? (I know, I was very hurt by what happened to me).
 

DRwyoming

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Sorry, this happened.
Do you have any suggestions of backpacks allowing me to get out easily and quickly my camera and it's lens? (I know, I was very hurt by what happened to me).
I don't know enough about the Vanguard photo pack to know why it would cause what happened but FWIW I use a Lowepro Flipside 300 AW II as my day hiking photo pack and I love it. It fits my D500 (or D5 or Z6 II) attached to the 500mm PF with the hood extended right down the center slot (Velcroed accessory pouch removed) and other lenses or camera bodies along the sides plus has room for a jacket, lunch or other things in the outside zip pocket. It's cushions the equipment very well and is much smaller and lighter than my other photo packs so it's joy to use compared to others.
 
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Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Sorry, this happened.

I don't know enough about the Vanguard photo pack to know why it would cause what happened but FWIW I use a Lowepro Flipside 300 AW II as my day hiking photo pack and I love it. It fits my D500 (or D5 or Z6 II) attached to the 500mm PF with the hood extended right down the center slot (Velcroed accessory pouch removed) and other lenses or camera bodies along the sides plus has room for a jacket, lunch or other things in the outside zip pocket. It's cushions the equipment very well and is much smaller and lighter than my other photo packs so it's joy to use compared to others.
Thank's a lot DRwyoming for your suggestion; I made a small research on the internet site of Quebec photo supply to see that this product has been discontinued; I will continue my research tomorow on US stores; the fact is that I used my Vanguard without any separation; so the camera was not perfectly vertical but at an angle; I suspect that the pressure of the headlamp on the largest top end of the camera created a sort of stress on the lens mount followed by the rupture of the lens mounting part.
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
I have a K&F Concept Professional 15.6". The D-500/500pf rides right down the center column, hood extended. Amazon sells.
Amazon.com : K&F Concept Professional Camera Backpack Bag,15.6 " Laptop Large Capacity Waterproof Nylon Photography Bag for DSLR Cameras,Tripod,Lenses : Electronics
Thank you very much for your information; certainly a good backpack too for my needs but I just ordered the Lowepro flipside 300 AW (discontinued model) directly from Lowepro Canada (95 US, including taxes and delivery)
 

Ado Wolf

Well-known member
I used to have the Lowepro Flipside 400 AW II, but found it not as comfy.. and it lacked space for anything else (like food and a jacket). Water bottle pocket is also relatively small & tight. So I upgraded to the Mindshift Backlight 26L and never looked back since. It's very comfortable, has plenty of space for more gear and personal items.
Only downside is the weight.. it is heavier than the Lowepro, but it feels lighter due to the increased comfort. I highly recommend it.

Otherwise I use my Lowepro flipside trek bp 450 aw, for my smaller setup (D7500+300+TC) and it is a joy to use. Is more comfortable that the classic Flipside and has a dedicated storage compartment for a jacket and food and what have you. Highly recommended.
 

fcotterill

Well-known member
Sorry to hear this disaster. You don't specify which model Vanguard. I have tried Alta Sky 45D and the larger 53. The latter was sold off, and I use the smaller pack occasionally with minimal gear. These packs have some great features, including protection, and notably the lateral zip working of internal divider panel of the 45D and 51D.

The lack of any usable outer storage pouches on these Vanguards is very irritating, and it's hard to fix by modifying the exterior to give one a zip pouch or more. These avoidable design faults are an all too common design fault with packs designed for outdoor photography.

[EDIT] The Mindshift Elite models are much better than Vanguard models I've tried, but I have gravitated to the f Stop Sukha for carrying full set of gear (2 telephotos etc) or the smaller Lotus. Both these brands have a generous top pouch in the lid for hat, jacket and headlamp etc. Its contents are separated from the ICU, byt the latter's top padded flap.
 
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fcotterill

Well-known member
here's a summary I posted 2+ years ago a while back elsewhere..... Brief update as mentioned I use f-stop mostly. I interchange the ICUs from Peakdesign and Mindshift. The Raptor waistcoat is often all I wear when hiking, as it can carry a macro and U-wide etc. And it's a boon when flying to pack away a 2nd camera and a couple of smaller lenses...

Based on initial reviews only, I took the plunge and bought the Mindshift Elite 45L Backpack. After 2 long flights, and testing in 2 hikes, So far I'm impressed. It meets my needs above and beyond the B'packs I have tried out. No perfect Backpack yet exists, especially to balance a handy Daypack capable of packing a fair pile of camera gear (eg Vanguard Sky 51D) vs the constraints of Airline-Friendly (eg PD Travel B'pack) vs the demands of Outdoor Hiking (eg f-Stop Sukha)

Summary of Comparisons with key positives (+ve) and negatives (-ve) with respect to seeking to dovetail the optimal solution that combines flights + fieldwork, and also wildlife photography in a vehicle using a generous inventory of Nikon gear. Almost all my photography is central and southern Africa.

My experience travelling over past few years with at least 10kg of cabin luggage (usually more) is that choice of airline is the biggest factor that controls if one succeeds in reaching the final destination without surrendering valuable gear into the hold (or worse). I've also sought out a solution suitable for hiking, where I have found a waistcoat and/or hipbelt backs up the backpack; ideal for peripherals. All backpacks have failed on at least 1 criterion, and in a key feature.

Wherever possible I fly British Airways, because the maximum cabin limit is usually 2 bags of 23kg each. Hence... the logical choice for wildlife photography trips with heavy Nikon gear! After trying several backpacks over the past 3 decades, I recently settled on the new Mindshift Elite 45L toward the optimum solution for carry on and hiking with 20+kg of gear. Previous to this, among the myriad of choices the more prominent models I have tried :

- Mindshift Backlight 26L: too little volume for big telephoto(s) but these do well for lighter kit (landscape) and day hikes etc. Decent weatherproofing against rain or dust;

- Vanguard Sky Alta 53: excellent for heavy gear loads +tripod (or drone) + big laptop but design team lost the plot on the bag's outside. There is no room for peripherals... weird design failure, which condemns this bag in the field and especially flying; where you want to pack in more than lots of photogear. However it does work well for daytrips with photogear only, although many users may prefer the 51D or 45D versions. So I have kept a 45D for local shooting with a telephoto and 2 bodies, and this pack is ideal for trip to shoot a landscape. The latter models have their main interior divided by a 2-tiered divider (optional) which is useful to organize and access items; access is via Top-Lid, the Rear Panel and through mid-bag "Caesarian section", thanks to the medial zip that opens the bag into 2 halves (top and bottom). The Top Lid on all these Sky Alta bags - the biggest 53 especially - is a notable plus to access a big rigged telephoto quickly. Really robust construction. More than Decent weatherproofing against rain or dust. But I finally sold on the 53, as it's not feasible to try and modify to take external pouches;

- Peak Design Travel Backpack: I subscribed via Kickstarter last year to entire system... accessories are all good. Conclusion 8+ months later is the Backpack is overpriced and fails in its lack of key features. Internal design works well, as does the rear and side panel access. No top access is a -ve; as you cannot access a medium to large lens rigged on a camera. Modular design is a big +ve. But the harness is a joke...even on a moderately loaded pack, given it is rated to take up to 45litres. Camera cube options are limited to smaller photogear mainly (fits a 400 f2.8 Nikkor). Exterior Side pouches prove too tight in practice. In practice these are useless (trying to quickly stash a sealed sandwich at a train-station kiosk crushed them flat!). Poor design at such high price applies especially to what PD has passed off as the "Hip-Belt". This is more a joke, as it is in fact a rip off. So this bag is limited to short trips and airport carry on. It fails as a travel backpack, primarily because the designers failed to upgrade the harness to handle carrying a decent load for longer than 1 hour at best. NOT for a half let alone full day's peregrination, whether urban or outdoors. OTH the packing cubes should fit most packs of similar size. [the Origami style pads/dividers are very useful in this respect, transplanted to another pack :)] Means to attach tripod is poor for this PD pack; it's really bad actually for a decent sized Sirui or Gitzo; especially when I compare fittings on the bigger Vanguards and Mindshift Backlights. Even though the pack is really well built with strong zips, it is not worth the high price, especially as PD charge extra for the raincoat;

- Mindshift Backlight Elite 45L: experience so far as this was recently released: The modular ICU can be vital if you run into strictures of cabin weight / space on a flight (ie regional flights, especially light planes and or draconian regulations). Plus the detachable Top-Lid + hipbelt metamorphoses on separate assembly into a hipbelt of copious volume. The top lid is a big plus to get rapid access to a big rigged telephoto. The only -ve is lack of side panel zip access into interior (as in PD Travel B'pack) but I can live without these. The Exterior Side pouches work in practice; so does the exterior strapping system for a tripod. I can pack water or food either side in these panels plus big tripod strapped outer centre.

And it goes without saying any backpack for wildlife must have rear panel access; in this case the padded Hipbelt of the Elite works well to access the bag off the ground (swung off one's shoulders). Another +ve is the Peakdesign camera cubes fit this pack almost perfectly (although the largest cube is shorter than the native camera cube supplied by Mindshift). Excellent weatherproofing against rain or dust with exterior spec fabrics and robust zips., plus included raincover. IMHO this bag is worth the relatively high price. The videos etc don't show in detail the tier of 3 lids to the bag's top: inner camera-module (3 sided zip); thin b'pack top (3 sided zip); and uppermost weather-proof pouch. The latter has 4 clips on each corner to remove, and it slides on the detaching waistbelt. The outer can also be extended on its 4 straps to add in more gear (folded jacket etc). The 2 innermost lids can be folded away

Misc Tactics

While the ultimate bag for max volume seems to be the likes of f-Stop Sukha with big ICU, it's not always possible to get these things into aircabins (!) Outdoors, OTOH, these bigger packs can carry plenty plus. They are designed for this task.

At checkin, I always wear a Waistcoat with lots of pockets. Even better than their Venture vest, the Country Innovation Raptor packs a gripped D850 into a main side pocket (+ much more) than the lighter Venture. Highly recommend the outdoor jackets etc by this UK company designed for people like us :


video review refers

Field Protecting a Super Telephoto Rig
Where I plan to shoot mainly in vehicles (also hides) I also pack a Lowepro Lens Trekker 600 AW III for dedicated super-telephoto protection/portage shooting. Besides being more inconspicuous, this pack helps minimize knocks, dust etc in the African hinterland. In flight(s), this bag goes inside a big sports bag into the hold with a tripod and misc. items filling its empty space.

The LensTrekker is long enough to carry an assembled 400 f2.8E + D850; and this rig also fits with added TC2 III. I replaced the thick padded base with a thinner EVA synthetic rubber insert; now the assembled 400 f2.8 fits with extended hood (total length = 625mm). The specs say this bag will also take a 600 f4 with DSLR.
 

BLev65

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I sorry to hear about your experience... nothing is worse than self-sabotage w/ one's gear. Nearly every serious photographer I know has experienced self-induced gear failure due to rushing or carelessness, so know that you are not alone.
As for gear bags, I have chosen to invest in high end bags because of how they fit on the back and how they are accessed in the field. I currently have 3 F-Stop (fstopgear.com) bags. My primary bag is the F-stop Tilopa with Large ICU ( https://shop.fstopgear.com/camera-bags/tilopa-50l-adventure-and-travel-camera-backpack/ ). It will easily fit your D500 (or D850) attached to the 500PF with hood in shooting position. This takes up one half of the ICE and will leave the other half or another body and lenses. There are external pockets on top and the backside of your bag and this will hold your headlamp among other things. Finally, the bag is built to be worn like a climbing backpack. While not as well designed as a technical pack, it comes pretty close.
The Tilopa is expensive, but I've had a pair for around 6 years (my wife has one too) and they continue to meet my need.

bruce
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Sorry to hear this disaster. You don't specify which model Vanguard. I have tried Alta Sky 45D and the larger 53. The latter was sold off, and I use the smaller pack occasionally with minimal gear. These packs have some great features, including protection, and notably the lateral zip working of internal divider panel of the 45D and 51D.

The lack of any usable outer storage pouches on these Vanguards is very irritating, and it's hard to fix by modifying the exterior to give one a zip pouch or more. These avoidable design faults are an all too common design fault with packs designed for outdoor photography.

[EDIT] The Mindshift Elite models are much better than Vanguard models I've tried, but I have gravitated to the f Stop Sukha for carrying full set of gear (2 telephotos etc) or the smaller Lotus. Both these brands have a generous top pouch in the lid for hat, jacket and headlamp etc. Its contents are separated from the ICU, byt the latter's top padded flap.
Thank you very much for your comments; my Vanguard is an old model (Adaptor 46) with side pockets; I removed most of the velcro divisions to get more room for my equipment but now I just banished it!
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
here's a summary I posted 2+ years ago a while back elsewhere..... Brief update as mentioned I use f-stop mostly. I interchange the ICUs from Peakdesign and Mindshift. The Raptor waistcoat is often all I wear when hiking, as it can carry a macro and U-wide etc. And it's a boon when flying to pack away a 2nd camera and a couple of smaller lenses...

Based on initial reviews only, I took the plunge and bought the Mindshift Elite 45L Backpack. After 2 long flights, and testing in 2 hikes, So far I'm impressed. It meets my needs above and beyond the B'packs I have tried out. No perfect Backpack yet exists, especially to balance a handy Daypack capable of packing a fair pile of camera gear (eg Vanguard Sky 51D) vs the constraints of Airline-Friendly (eg PD Travel B'pack) vs the demands of Outdoor Hiking (eg f-Stop Sukha)

Summary of Comparisons with key positives (+ve) and negatives (-ve) with respect to seeking to dovetail the optimal solution that combines flights + fieldwork, and also wildlife photography in a vehicle using a generous inventory of Nikon gear. Almost all my photography is central and southern Africa.

My experience travelling over past few years with at least 10kg of cabin luggage (usually more) is that choice of airline is the biggest factor that controls if one succeeds in reaching the final destination without surrendering valuable gear into the hold (or worse). I've also sought out a solution suitable for hiking, where I have found a waistcoat and/or hipbelt backs up the backpack; ideal for peripherals. All backpacks have failed on at least 1 criterion, and in a key feature.

Wherever possible I fly British Airways, because the maximum cabin limit is usually 2 bags of 23kg each. Hence... the logical choice for wildlife photography trips with heavy Nikon gear! After trying several backpacks over the past 3 decades, I recently settled on the new Mindshift Elite 45L toward the optimum solution for carry on and hiking with 20+kg of gear. Previous to this, among the myriad of choices the more prominent models I have tried :

- Mindshift Backlight 26L: too little volume for big telephoto(s) but these do well for lighter kit (landscape) and day hikes etc. Decent weatherproofing against rain or dust;

- Vanguard Sky Alta 53: excellent for heavy gear loads +tripod (or drone) + big laptop but design team lost the plot on the bag's outside. There is no room for peripherals... weird design failure, which condemns this bag in the field and especially flying; where you want to pack in more than lots of photogear. However it does work well for daytrips with photogear only, although many users may prefer the 51D or 45D versions. So I have kept a 45D for local shooting with a telephoto and 2 bodies, and this pack is ideal for trip to shoot a landscape. The latter models have their main interior divided by a 2-tiered divider (optional) which is useful to organize and access items; access is via Top-Lid, the Rear Panel and through mid-bag "Caesarian section", thanks to the medial zip that opens the bag into 2 halves (top and bottom). The Top Lid on all these Sky Alta bags - the biggest 53 especially - is a notable plus to access a big rigged telephoto quickly. Really robust construction. More than Decent weatherproofing against rain or dust. But I finally sold on the 53, as it's not feasible to try and modify to take external pouches;

- Peak Design Travel Backpack: I subscribed via Kickstarter last year to entire system... accessories are all good. Conclusion 8+ months later is the Backpack is overpriced and fails in its lack of key features. Internal design works well, as does the rear and side panel access. No top access is a -ve; as you cannot access a medium to large lens rigged on a camera. Modular design is a big +ve. But the harness is a joke...even on a moderately loaded pack, given it is rated to take up to 45litres. Camera cube options are limited to smaller photogear mainly (fits a 400 f2.8 Nikkor). Exterior Side pouches prove too tight in practice. In practice these are useless (trying to quickly stash a sealed sandwich at a train-station kiosk crushed them flat!). Poor design at such high price applies especially to what PD has passed off as the "Hip-Belt". This is more a joke, as it is in fact a rip off. So this bag is limited to short trips and airport carry on. It fails as a travel backpack, primarily because the designers failed to upgrade the harness to handle carrying a decent load for longer than 1 hour at best. NOT for a half let alone full day's peregrination, whether urban or outdoors. OTH the packing cubes should fit most packs of similar size. [the Origami style pads/dividers are very useful in this respect, transplanted to another pack :)] Means to attach tripod is poor for this PD pack; it's really bad actually for a decent sized Sirui or Gitzo; especially when I compare fittings on the bigger Vanguards and Mindshift Backlights. Even though the pack is really well built with strong zips, it is not worth the high price, especially as PD charge extra for the raincoat;

- Mindshift Backlight Elite 45L: experience so far as this was recently released: The modular ICU can be vital if you run into strictures of cabin weight / space on a flight (ie regional flights, especially light planes and or draconian regulations). Plus the detachable Top-Lid + hipbelt metamorphoses on separate assembly into a hipbelt of copious volume. The top lid is a big plus to get rapid access to a big rigged telephoto. The only -ve is lack of side panel zip access into interior (as in PD Travel B'pack) but I can live without these. The Exterior Side pouches work in practice; so does the exterior strapping system for a tripod. I can pack water or food either side in these panels plus big tripod strapped outer centre.

And it goes without saying any backpack for wildlife must have rear panel access; in this case the padded Hipbelt of the Elite works well to access the bag off the ground (swung off one's shoulders). Another +ve is the Peakdesign camera cubes fit this pack almost perfectly (although the largest cube is shorter than the native camera cube supplied by Mindshift). Excellent weatherproofing against rain or dust with exterior spec fabrics and robust zips., plus included raincover. IMHO this bag is worth the relatively high price. The videos etc don't show in detail the tier of 3 lids to the bag's top: inner camera-module (3 sided zip); thin b'pack top (3 sided zip); and uppermost weather-proof pouch. The latter has 4 clips on each corner to remove, and it slides on the detaching waistbelt. The outer can also be extended on its 4 straps to add in more gear (folded jacket etc). The 2 innermost lids can be folded away

Misc Tactics

While the ultimate bag for max volume seems to be the likes of f-Stop Sukha with big ICU, it's not always possible to get these things into aircabins (!) Outdoors, OTOH, these bigger packs can carry plenty plus. They are designed for this task.

At checkin, I always wear a Waistcoat with lots of pockets. Even better than their Venture vest, the Country Innovation Raptor packs a gripped D850 into a main side pocket (+ much more) than the lighter Venture. Highly recommend the outdoor jackets etc by this UK company designed for people like us :


video review refers

Field Protecting a Super Telephoto Rig
Where I plan to shoot mainly in vehicles (also hides) I also pack a Lowepro Lens Trekker 600 AW III for dedicated super-telephoto protection/portage shooting. Besides being more inconspicuous, this pack helps minimize knocks, dust etc in the African hinterland. In flight(s), this bag goes inside a big sports bag into the hold with a tripod and misc. items filling its empty space.

The LensTrekker is long enough to carry an assembled 400 f2.8E + D850; and this rig also fits with added TC2 III. I replaced the thick padded base with a thinner EVA synthetic rubber insert; now the assembled 400 f2.8 fits with extended hood (total length = 625mm). The specs say this bag will also take a 600 f4 with DSLR.
Thank you for sharing the results of your research and of your experiences with different models; I already own a bigger travel backpack (Lowepro Runner BP 350 AW II) which is ok for my needs (D500 + 500PF + 300PF + 17-55 + TC-14E III) when I took airplane (tested two years ago when I went to Yellowstone NP); certainly to big for me for day hicking or when I use my bicycle!
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
I sorry to hear about your experience... nothing is worse than self-sabotage w/ one's gear. Nearly every serious photographer I know has experienced self-induced gear failure due to rushing or carelessness, so know that you are not alone.
As for gear bags, I have chosen to invest in high end bags because of how they fit on the back and how they are accessed in the field. I currently have 3 F-Stop (fstopgear.com) bags. My primary bag is the F-stop Tilopa with Large ICU ( https://shop.fstopgear.com/camera-bags/tilopa-50l-adventure-and-travel-camera-backpack/ ). It will easily fit your D500 (or D850) attached to the 500PF with hood in shooting position. This takes up one half of the ICE and will leave the other half or another body and lenses. There are external pockets on top and the backside of your bag and this will hold your headlamp among other things. Finally, the bag is built to be worn like a climbing backpack. While not as well designed as a technical pack, it comes pretty close.
The Tilopa is expensive, but I've had a pair for around 6 years (my wife has one too) and they continue to meet my need.

bruce
Thank you for your suggestion! I like your expression ''Self-sabotage'' but it was not premeditated to give me a good excuse to buy another gear:) For daily hicking, I only take my D500 and 500 PF ready to be used + my monopod.
 

splatbass

Well-known member
Mindshift Backlight 36L. Well built, tough as nails. The only issue I have is it holds so much gear that it can get heavy. But my D850 with 500PF or 200-500 fits well.
 

eaj101

Well-known member
It's tough to know exactly what would fit your needs. For example, I often carry things like a jacket or rain gear or lunch as well depending on how long I'll be out. You might look at a couple of vendors who make a full range and then pick the size and contour that fits your needs. I've had good luck with Lowepro, Gura Gear, and Think Tank/Mindshift. All well designed and flexible. There are different profiles and openings (top load, side load, flaps) to suit different people. As an example, I have a giant Lowepro when I'm carrying everything and will be close to the car, a Think Tank Airport for air travel, a Gura Gear for general use, a Think Tank Glass Limo for just the 600mm f4...

I think collecting camera bags is the photographer's not-so-secret vice. I think I have a closet full.
 

RichF

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Depending upon the amount of gear , your build, etc I use FStop bags when I need to hike and gura gear bags when I travel.
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
It's tough to know exactly what would fit your needs. For example, I often carry things like a jacket or rain gear or lunch as well depending on how long I'll be out. You might look at a couple of vendors who make a full range and then pick the size and contour that fits your needs. I've had good luck with Lowepro, Gura Gear, and Think Tank/Mindshift. All well designed and flexible. There are different profiles and openings (top load, side load, flaps) to suit different people. As an example, I have a giant Lowepro when I'm carrying everything and will be close to the car, a Think Tank Airport for air travel, a Gura Gear for general use, a Think Tank Glass Limo for just the 600mm f4...

I think collecting camera bags is the photographer's not-so-secret vice. I think I have a closet full.
Thank you for your recommandations; for my needs, and following the suggestion of DRwyoming, I ordered and received the Lowepro flipside 300 AWII; I will test as soon as I will have received my repaired gear from Nikon Canada.
 

Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Strongliy recommend if you need to hike w/ camera gear (not just one camera) - either outdoors or long walks in the airport, etc.
Thank you for your advice! I put the name of the company in my favorites...may be the beginning for me of a new backpack's collection!:)
 

Ziggy

Well-known member
Supporting Member
When waterproof is needed I use an Overboard pack with an f-stop ICU or an Overboard holster if it'll fit the rig.
I also use a 70l f-stop pack with the telemaster/cinemaster ICU but don't trust it to be 100% waterproof.
 
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Cristobal

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
When waterproof is needed I use an Overboard pack with an f-stop ICU or an Overboard holster if it'll fit the rig.
I also use a 70l f-stop pack with the telemaster/cinemaster ICU but don't trust it to be 100% waterproof.
Thank you! In the same topic, I use a Geckobrands waterproof backpack, wide enough for my D500 and 500 PF, when I go kayaking. Hydroner 20L Waterproof Backpack - Grey/Black | geckobrands
 

MikePapple

Active member
Sorry, this happened.

I don't know enough about the Vanguard photo pack to know why it would cause what happened but FWIW I use a Lowepro Flipside 300 AW II as my day hiking photo pack and I love it. It fits my D500 (or D5 or Z6 II) attached to the 500mm PF with the hood extended right down the center slot (Velcroed accessory pouch removed) and other lenses or camera bodies along the sides plus has room for a jacket, lunch or other things in the outside zip pocket. It's cushions the equipment very well and is much smaller and lighter than my other photo packs so it's joy to use compared to others.
I own the Lowepro Flipside 300, 500 AW... Just recently I purchased from Amazon.ca the Lowepro Protactic BP 450 AW II. It is 'carry-on' sized, and will fit my A1 +2xTC +200-600G. The padding is much better than my other bags, especially if I am carrying $20,000+ worth of gear.
 
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