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Gottshotz

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A2C06241-Edit.jpg
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Although Worldwide, this medium/large "booted eagle" is better known as Bonelli's Eagle. Here in the Anadalucian mountains of southern Spain Myxosomatosis had decimated the Rabbit population in the 1990's, and so the Spanish population of this striking raptor have had to switch prey to survive.

A2C06067-Edit-Edit-Edit.jpg
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Because their prey is largely ground dwelling these Eagles seldom catch birds on the wing but prefer to fly low over the ground and may even hunt on foot to secure a meal. Widely distributed from Southern Spain right across Europe and Asia to China, it is listed as "endangered" in Europe due to habitat loss.

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Red-legged Partridge are now the preferred prey, but pigeons, reptiles and mammals will suffice, and some of the larger females (over 5 foot wingspan) have been observed hunting foxes !

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These raptors do not migrate and tend to use the same nest over many years, which can attain a width of 2 metres--this particular couple have a resident colony of Gryphon Vultures nearby and often get mobbed by the larger birds who fear for their chicks during the breeding season.

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This is the male, which is usually 10% smaller than the female, and with whiter chest feathers. It is quite happy to forage on the ground.

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These Eagles have been known to live for up to 32 years, and mate for life. The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and unlike many other raptors the eldest chick does not kill its younger siblings.
 

Butlerkid

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Exquisite set of images! Amazing sharpness and clarity! And thank you for providing so much information about these birds!
 

Gottshotz

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Just a terrific looking eagle. Great images
Thanks Patrick, it is a very striking bird and quick in the air too, as it has slightly narrow streamlined wings compared to other "booted eagles".
 

Gottshotz

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Interesting read, and six superb images. Wonderful
Thanks Charles --- having trained as a Zoologist, I was encouraged to complement images with relevant facts to help the viewer place the subject better in its natural environment. A lesson I have appreciated more as time goes on !
 

Gottshotz

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Exquisite set of images! Amazing sharpness and clarity! And thank you for providing so much information about these birds!
Thanks Karen --- Hard to beat the Sony 400mm f2.8 on a tripod for sharpness, it's also good handheld, but as I had time here, thanks to a local guide, I took full advantage of the full "rig". As you know, I always try to add some pertinent facts, especially if the subject is not so well known.
 

Ralph

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View attachment 56799

Although Worldwide, this medium/large "booted eagle" is better known as Bonelli's Eagle. Here in the Anadalucian mountains of southern Spain Myxosomatosis had decimated the Rabbit population in the 1990's, and so the Spanish population of this striking raptor have had to switch prey to survive.

View attachment 56800

Because their prey is largely ground dwelling these Eagles seldom catch birds on the wing but prefer to fly low over the ground and may even hunt on foot to secure a meal. Widely distributed from Southern Spain right across Europe and Asia to China, it is listed as "endangered" in Europe due to habitat loss.

View attachment 56801

Red-legged Partridge are now the preferred prey, but pigeons, reptiles and mammals will suffice, and some of the larger females (over 5 foot wingspan) have been observed hunting foxes !

View attachment 56802

These raptors do not migrate and tend to use the same nest over many years, which can attain a width of 2 metres--this particular couple have a resident colony of Gryphon Vultures nearby and often get mobbed by the larger birds who fear for their chicks during the breeding season.

View attachment 56803

This is the male, which is usually 10% smaller than the female, and with whiter chest feathers. It is quite happy to forage on the ground.

View attachment 56804

These Eagles have been known to live for up to 32 years, and mate for life. The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and unlike many other raptors the eldest chick does not kill its younger siblings.
Beautiful series! Well doneπŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘
 

Rookie Roy

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View attachment 56799

Although Worldwide, this medium/large "booted eagle" is better known as Bonelli's Eagle. Here in the Anadalucian mountains of southern Spain Myxosomatosis had decimated the Rabbit population in the 1990's, and so the Spanish population of this striking raptor have had to switch prey to survive.

View attachment 56800

Because their prey is largely ground dwelling these Eagles seldom catch birds on the wing but prefer to fly low over the ground and may even hunt on foot to secure a meal. Widely distributed from Southern Spain right across Europe and Asia to China, it is listed as "endangered" in Europe due to habitat loss.

View attachment 56801

Red-legged Partridge are now the preferred prey, but pigeons, reptiles and mammals will suffice, and some of the larger females (over 5 foot wingspan) have been observed hunting foxes !

View attachment 56802

These raptors do not migrate and tend to use the same nest over many years, which can attain a width of 2 metres--this particular couple have a resident colony of Gryphon Vultures nearby and often get mobbed by the larger birds who fear for their chicks during the breeding season.

View attachment 56803

This is the male, which is usually 10% smaller than the female, and with whiter chest feathers. It is quite happy to forage on the ground.

View attachment 56804

These Eagles have been known to live for up to 32 years, and mate for life. The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and unlike many other raptors the eldest chick does not kill its younger siblings
View attachment 56799

Although Worldwide, this medium/large "booted eagle" is better known as Bonelli's Eagle. Here in the Anadalucian mountains of southern Spain Myxosomatosis had decimated the Rabbit population in the 1990's, and so the Spanish population of this striking raptor have had to switch prey to survive.

View attachment 56800

Because their prey is largely ground dwelling these Eagles seldom catch birds on the wing but prefer to fly low over the ground and may even hunt on foot to secure a meal. Widely distributed from Southern Spain right across Europe and Asia to China, it is listed as "endangered" in Europe due to habitat loss.

View attachment 56801

Red-legged Partridge are now the preferred prey, but pigeons, reptiles and mammals will suffice, and some of the larger females (over 5 foot wingspan) have been observed hunting foxes !

View attachment 56802

These raptors do not migrate and tend to use the same nest over many years, which can attain a width of 2 metres--this particular couple have a resident colony of Gryphon Vultures nearby and often get mobbed by the larger birds who fear for their chicks during the breeding season.

View attachment 56803

This is the male, which is usually 10% smaller than the female, and with whiter chest feathers. It is quite happy to forage on the ground.

View attachment 56804

These Eagles have been known to live for up to 32 years, and mate for life. The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and unlike many other raptors the eldest chick does not kill its younger siblings.
Beautiful eagle and interesting facts! Well done! Thank you for sharing.
 

Gottshotz

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Nice pics, and thanks for the information on these birds!
No problem Woody, my next target raptor is the Spanish Imperial Eagle, which is even more endangered in Spain than the Bonelli, but I have discovered a possible site to view them later this year -- fingers crossed.
 

Syllog

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View attachment 56799

Although Worldwide, this medium/large "booted eagle" is better known as Bonelli's Eagle. Here in the Anadalucian mountains of southern Spain Myxosomatosis had decimated the Rabbit population in the 1990's, and so the Spanish population of this striking raptor have had to switch prey to survive.

View attachment 56800

Because their prey is largely ground dwelling these Eagles seldom catch birds on the wing but prefer to fly low over the ground and may even hunt on foot to secure a meal. Widely distributed from Southern Spain right across Europe and Asia to China, it is listed as "endangered" in Europe due to habitat loss.

View attachment 56801

Red-legged Partridge are now the preferred prey, but pigeons, reptiles and mammals will suffice, and some of the larger females (over 5 foot wingspan) have been observed hunting foxes !

View attachment 56802

These raptors do not migrate and tend to use the same nest over many years, which can attain a width of 2 metres--this particular couple have a resident colony of Gryphon Vultures nearby and often get mobbed by the larger birds who fear for their chicks during the breeding season.

View attachment 56803

This is the male, which is usually 10% smaller than the female, and with whiter chest feathers. It is quite happy to forage on the ground.

View attachment 56804

These Eagles have been known to live for up to 32 years, and mate for life. The females lay 1 to 3 eggs and unlike many other raptors the eldest chick does not kill its younger siblings.
Really nice work David!
 

Gottshotz

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Very nice series, David.
Thanks Jochen, glad you liked them and your complements are much appreciated ---I hear that there have been an increasing number of wolf pack sightings in Belgium recently, have you come across them yet ?
 

Jmaes

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Thanks Jochen, glad you liked them and your complements are much appreciated ---I hear that there have been an increasing number of wolf pack sightings in Belgium recently, have you come across them yet ?

Wolves have been succesfully breeding in Belgium over the past few years indeed and their numbers are slowly going up. There's still only an estimated 25'ish inviduals in the country though.

I've only ever seen one (last year). But that was from quite a distance away (driving by a field early morning).
 

Gottshotz

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Wolves have been succesfully breeding in Belgium over the past few years indeed and their numbers are slowly going up. There's still only an estimated 25'ish inviduals in the country though.

I've only ever seen one (last year). But that was from quite a distance away (driving by a field early morning).
That's interesting, because the TV report I saw 2 nights ago was suggesting that this was a Europe-wide problem of great concern to the farming communities and I wondered if this was being orchestrated by an anti re-wilding group using this medium to "blow it out of proportion" ?