Tundra Swan (left behind?)

If you would like to post, you'll need to register. Note that if you have a BCG store account, you'll need a new, separate account here (we keep the two sites separate for security purposes).

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
A lone juvenile tundra swan among the Canadas on a city park pond this morning. These birds (the western flock) summer on the Canadian and Alaskan tundra and then migrate (mostly) to the pacific northwest (California and BC). Rare apparently to see 'em here. COLD shoot this morning at -8C. That was a blessing however as I was shooting face down on the ground covered by a great deal of goose, ah, droppings, which was thankfully frozen so not inclined to stick to me :p
Nikon D6; 180-400; handheld.
tundra swan sized_.jpg
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Interesting, hope he's not in trouble being left behind like that? Lovely looking bird! Nice Shot (y)
Yes, me too; as a juvenile I'm assuming s/he does not know where to go; let alone have the power as a single bird to fly the couple thousand kms!
 

Hut

---
Supporting Member
A lone juvenile tundra swan among the Canadas on a city park pond this morning. These birds (the western flock) summer on the Canadian and Alaskan tundra and then migrate (mostly) to the pacific northwest (California and BC). Rare apparently to see 'em here. COLD shoot this morning at -8C. That was a blessing however as I was shooting face down on the ground covered by a great deal of goose, ah, droppings, which was thankfully frozen so not inclined to stick to me :p
Nikon D6; 180-400; handheld.View attachment 7783
We get Swans here in Central Washington during the winter. We always have some open water somewhere around. Maybe he will stick with the honkers
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Interesting story. I think they might survive if they have open water. Nice swan
Just did some reading. Apparently juvenile tundra swans do not migrate with their parents and adults and make it to winter migration sites on their own, unaided for directions by adult birds, so this one I'd guess just resting and eating before continuing! And oh there will be NO open for several weeks once winter sets in fully -- even the fast flowing parts of the river can freeze over. Average winter temp here has gotta be at least -10C and -40 and worse for a week or two on end is possible. It's why I have buy second camera batteries to keep in my pocket with a hand warmer :)
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
We get Swans here in Central Washington during the winter. We always have some open water somewhere around. Maybe he will stick with the honkers
See my note to Callie -- apparently the tundra juveniles migrate without adult supervision and often start the journey sooner or later than the adults.
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Very nice shot, Steven! Did you catch water dripping from his beak, or is it an icicle?
Thanks! No it's still liquid water, that. :D Only the edges of the pond were frozen; hasn't been cold enough, long enough yet to get the deeper water to freezing temps.
 

Gaduf

Member
Hi Steven ,
Thanks for sharing from someone from a very different part of the world [Climate ],
Where I live I have seen snow twice in my lifetime.
Fascinating story and picture of a beautiful bird,
Gavin
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Hi Steven ,
Thanks for sharing from someone from a very different part of the world [Climate ],
Where I live I have seen snow twice in my lifetime.
Fascinating story and picture of a beautiful bird,
Gavin
Thanks. Glad you liked it. Stay tuned I suspect I'll be sharing photos with lots of snow in them in the coming months :D
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Cool looking Guy, hope he gets to his destination!
Yah, me too! Glad to read a lone juvenile during migration is not unusual. Years ago in Manitoba I saw a grain field utterly filled with a flock of tundras -- the sound was magnificently loud; it was just at sunrise and the birds were stirring and calling -- so when I saw this single bird I mistakenly concluded she must be lost....
 

Woodyg3

Active member
Supporting Member
You must be like me, in that I am always interested in the well being of the animals I photograph.

I like the eye contact on this shot, and the mood of the lighting. Well done.
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
You must be like me, in that I am always interested in the well being of the animals I photograph.

I like the eye contact on this shot, and the mood of the lighting. Well done.
Thank a lot. When I first spotted her she was head fully tucked under wing and utterly disinterested no matter how close I got, so I thought she might be exhausted, or worse ill. She eventually got up and started to feed, to my relief :)
 

Hut

---
Supporting Member
Is this in Edmonton Alberta? If so, “Don Delaney” has a similar Swan on his Flickr staying close to the geese. Same thing a lonely first winter swan.
Don is very knowledgeable and has a great collection of bird and wildlife Photos
 
Top