Windy Day? Lose The Lens Hood!

If you would like to post, you'll need to register. Note that if you have a BCG store account, you'll need a new, separate account here (we keep the two sites separate for security purposes).

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
If you use long lenses for wildlife, you know that big glass often comes with an equally big hood. However, if the winds are brisk, sometimes that hood can turn into a liability.

On a windy day, the larger your rig's "sail area," the more movement and vibration it experiences due to the wind. In fact, I've watched the entire scene in my viewfinder vibrate like it was experiencing an earthquake during strong gusts (and that's on a heavy tripod). By removing the lens hood, you cut down on your "sail area" and increase stability. In fact, depending on the angle the wind is hitting the hood, removing it sometimes leads to a substantial increase in overall stability. I've been in more than a few situations with slower shutter speeds where this little trick has saved the day.

Of course, ideally, you want the sun to your back or side when you remove the hood - if it's in front of you it can cause flare and a loss of contrast. Still, I've shot without hoods and from my own experience, the sun isn't a problem until it's almost directly in front of you. If that's the case, you'll have to determine which is worse - the movement caused by the wind or the potential lens flare. If the shutter speeds are slow, then I risk flare. If I have the light, I'll crank up the shutter speed and keep the hood attached.

And of course, no worries on cloudy days.

Finally, remember if you remove the hood to exercise extreme caution - the hood offers a lot of protection.

Still, I've gone "hoodless" countless times on windy days and it can really make a difference, especially with slower shutter speeds.
 

Jhvuhvhuvuvuv

New member
That’s good advice that’s also valid for shooting from aircraft. I also often remove the strap when my camera is in a tripod and it’s windig.
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
Would it be just as effective to reverse the lens hood? That way I don't lose it.
Usually - depends if the hood is in the way of the other controls you need (zoom ring, focus ring, etc).
 

clippy

Active member
Supporting Member
Usually - depends if the hood is in the way of the other controls you need (zoom ring, focus ring, etc).
Makes sense but I'm bad for losing things! Please keep these short tips coming I can use all the help that I can get!!
 

ssheipel

Well-known member
Supporting Member
Makes sense but I'm bad for losing things! Please keep these short tips coming I can use all the help that I can get!!
My immediate thought, as well: Dang, the thing is huge but I'm gonna leave it behind for sure!
 

Woodpecker

Member
Supporting Member
There is somebody who tackles vibration issues for super-tele lenses in a special way, because he found that already under normal conditions the single point support can cause problems and so the solution will most likely also help with wind if you are in conditions where you need the hood. He goes for three point support that can help a lot providing that the rest of the system (i.e. tripod and head) are stable enough. I have used one of his custom tripod rail systems on my old 200-400 VR (see picture) and I also have it on my 500 f4G VR. In fact I bought the 500 with the thing installed from a friend who is a pro photographer. He is regularly out for taking photos in the nature reserves in North-East Germany and especially at the Baltic sea shore and he loves it, because there you can often have bright sun and heay wind at the same time.

_TN21406_b3.jpg


Depending on the lens it is not significantly heavier or even lighter than the original foot. Vertical shooting works fine and you can move it far enough to allow handholding as well. If you use lens coats you might have to cut out a little bit depending on how you installed it. It is not a design miracle, but it does the job. In my eyes the only disadavantage might be that it cannot be used as a handle as comfortably as other feet - and it is more expensive than leaving the hood at home :D.
 

Calson

Member
It also helps to get as low as is practical when it is windy. Quite a difference in wind speed at 24 inches above the ground versus 60 inches or higher. I also consider the direction of the wind at a location and try to get it head on instead of from the side. This also reduces how much of my scent reaches the animal I am trying to photograph.
 

Nikondale

New member
Supporting Member
That long- lens support looks interesting. I believe Steve needs to start manufacturing good camera stuff, in his spare time of course.
Ps who makes the support?
 

Nikondale

New member
Supporting Member
I believe Lenscoat makes something called a travel hood to be used in place of the rigid hood on our long lenses. Has anybody considered one for windy applications?
 

DRwyoming

Well-known member
Supporting Member
I believe Lenscoat makes something called a travel hood to be used in place of the rigid hood on our long lenses. Has anybody considered one for windy applications?
I have one that I use most of the time instead of the original Nikon hoods on my 600mm f/4. It helps everything pack down smaller and fits better into my photo pack. It might help with the wind a tiny bit but it's still a fairly rigid sail sticking out in front of the lens to catch the wind and apply extra leverage to the camera mount.
 

Steve

Admin
Staff member
Supporting Member
Thread starter
I believe Lenscoat makes something called a travel hood to be used in place of the rigid hood on our long lenses. Has anybody considered one for windy applications?
I have one, liked it at first, but the truth is I was always fiddling with it in the field. It has a tendency to get cockeyed and after awhile you just get tired of messing with it.
 

Woodpecker

Member
Supporting Member
That long- lens support looks interesting. I believe Steve needs to start manufacturing good camera stuff, in his spare time of course.
Ps who makes the support?
The guy is called Rainer Burzynski. I had one of these three point support rail systems for a 200-400 F4 VR I, and two different versions for a 500 f4 G VR.
The (later) second version I had to get because the old version I have used with D6x0 + grip was colliding with the D750 + grip.

I don't know whether or not he is still active and he is more the "old school analogue type" with handmade catalogue on paper, no online presentation of his products, online shop etc. As far as I know product catalogue and mounting manuals are in German only, but I may be wrong. It is certainly worth asking. As I remember hearing him talk about international travelling for photography I believe he communitates in English as well, but I never tried it for obvious reasons ;).

What I can say is that the build quality of his parts is excellent and built to last a lifetime. He is thoroughbred mechanic and perfectionist - and a real character.
 

Nikondale

New member
Supporting Member
The guy is called Rainer Burzynski. I had one of these three point support rail systems for a 200-400 F4 VR I, and two different versions for a 500 f4 G VR.
The (later) second version I had to get because the old version I have used with D6x0 + grip was colliding with the D750 + grip.

I don't know whether or not he is still active and he is more the "old school analogue type" with handmade catalogue on paper, no online presentation of his products, online shop etc. As far as I know product catalogue and mounting manuals are in German only, but I may be wrong. It is certainly worth asking. As I remember hearing him talk about international travelling for photography I believe he communitates in English as well, but I never tried it for obvious reasons ;).

What I can say is that the build quality of his parts is excellent and built to last a lifetime. He is thoroughbred mechanic and perfectionist - and a real character.
Ranier looks like a dead-end for me, thank you for the information
 
Top