I'm confused

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My bad back during my 40s kept me from sitting and off the golf course for 5 years. I moaned a lot!😊
Encouraging to know it only took five years to fix itself. Not relevant for my condition as I am booked in for a body transplant in 2027.
PS I got two photos of King Parrots today. Three birds turned up so I travelled over 4m onto the deck to take pictures. Light was not good and the reds of the male are always difficult.

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Used a 2x converter on the 100-400 zoom, distance was about 3m maybe less.
 
I'm missing one fundamental item on that list, Robert: Distance. No matter how good the gear is, if distance is inappropiate for the subject vs frame, we are doomed and will only get a testimonial shot (that may be the final goal for many, of course!).

As to what drives or inspires this hobby... to me, is the sheer rush of the moment, the excitement of seeing the animal, the challenge of trying to (and more often than not, failing) to get them shot in a special situation...

Add to all this the preparation of the trip (short or long), thinking the targets, the gear to use (if you are having multiple choices), the (again) excitement of starting the travel (road or air) after planning what to pack, arriving to location, unpacking the gear and start checking all the settings (once again...)...

And finally, after each session, the checking on the laptop (on location) of the first pictures, thinking "I know I have one, I know I did get the one!" (only to find out it wasn't...LOL!)...

Editing in a rush the first pics and uploading it or sharing thru the cell it with your nearest and dearest ones that stayed back home worried about you being eaten by a croc... (LOL again).

Finally, starting to share (here kicks in the ego) online the pictures, to somehow "collect back" some of the "investment", not in $ but in praise, likes, comments... and then get a few printed or sending the files for friends to print...

We at home enjoy A LOT when friends comes home asking "hey, show us your pictures, I've seen one in FB and I bet there are more!".

I (very) proudly turn on the 85" TV screen and start scrolling thru the pics... much like when I was a kid and my parents would gather the family and friends to show them their travel slides projected on the wall... and tell them (before they fall asleep) the details about each one, enjoying their "awww" and their "wowww" each time. That's enough for me to start thinking about the next outing!

Not sure if this adds or not any positive thinking Robert, just thinking out loud here.
Thanks for the post Marcelo. I first went to Spain in 1962. Amazing place. Spent a week in

Sant Feliu de Guíxols

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Probably changed a bit since I was there.
 
Thanks for the post Marcelo. I first went to Spain in 1962. Amazing place. Spent a week in

Sant Feliu de Guíxols

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Probably changed a bit since I was there.

1962! LOL! I was 3...
I never been to that place (been nearby though), nor have I lived all my life in Spain (I´ve been here for the last 20 years or so). I'd bet there are some places that still are keeping the atmosphere in some ways, keeping traditions alive. krgds, Marcelo
 
Interesting posts. Thanks for starting this thread.

I'm not sure "art" really needs a purpose. It's enough to make art for the sake of art. Pull out your camera and good things can happen.

I've got a friend who lives in Colorado. Once when we were in Rocky Mountain NP with a herd of elk in flat light he commented. "I don't care if I ever make another photo of an elk." He had a portfolio of great images of elk under all conditions - many images in great light, fog, or mist. He recognized conditions that were uninspiring for the subject in front of us. For many of us - IT'S AN ELK! - TAKE A PHOTO.

Jay Maisel is known for seeing great photographs while on daily walks around his home in New York. He sees things others walk by and ignore - abstracts, shapes, colors, textures, etc. Nikon Ambassador Joey Terrill does the same type thing with lighting and common household items. Mike Moats takes the same approach to macro nature photography. All are capturing things they see - not necessarily things they plan to photograph.

On more than one occasion I've combined birding with bird photography. The photos I make often include small, out of focus, distant subjects. But the photos have use for identification. On more than one occasion I've deleted the entire card after a couple of hours in the field. I know that none of the photos have value - but really enjoyed being out in nature. Go on a walk and take your camera.
 
Robert...one of my primary reasons for photography is creating memories. I do mostly wildlife with a penchant for birds. I have realized I will never see them all in this lifetime. But the ones I have, occupy a good deal of neural real estate. It puts a smile on my face to remember the moment, who I was with and then the colors and patterns on the screen later. This is why I have a Flikr page. When I can longer schlep it all into the field or just tire of the travel, my memories will remind me of just what a beautiful life I have lived...instead of the trial and tribulations that ales all humans. I have arthritis and go the gym 5 days a week. Strength training and yoga has really helped me be more functional. I also really like that this is both a technical and artistic endeavor. And I just like the feel of the camera in my hands. I am grateful for forums where I learn how to think differently and get to see what others create and enjoy. It inspires me to try different things. And then there is nature itself. Just can't beat being outside!
 
In the last several years I have photographed mostly wildlife, although I still do on occasion photograph nature and landscape images. For me, wildlife, especially in action, is a challenge and I love that and I love being outside in beautiful natural settings. I am compelled to take photographs and I see the possibilities all around me daily, even though I may not take the photograph.

I'll often set a goal when I go on a trip, based on a specific animal or setting. Setting a goal continues the challenge for me. Perhaps setting a goal that you have not attained may help to inspire you?

We all have down times and, as someone else said, maybe some time off to contemplate might help, too. Only you can determine why you want to be a photographer and what might inspire you to keep interested in photography so maybe a bit of soul searching is in order.

I often read the history of photography, in particular, the California history (I live in Northern CA) that includes Ansel Adams and the f/64 group and that always inspires me to try harder to attain new heights in my photography. That group of people worked so very hard to make the public see photography as the art it is and I appreciate what they did for photography in general. Perhaps reading the history of photography in your area would help to motivate you?

Photography for me is a passion and my life revolves around it so I try to keep that passion going in many ways, reading, travel, new ideas, etc.
 
For most of the 50+ years that I worked in forest and field I carried a camera and took thousands of photographs of wildlife, wildflowers, scenery and all things natural (and family of course). I'm still taking photos, averaging over 100 a day, every day of the year. Why do I do it? To document what's out there, to give me something to do, to learn something new, but most of all to take a closer look at the natural world and see things I've never seen before (or maybe just never noticed) -- the collembola under the decaying leaves, a butterfly's eye, an eagle feeding it's young, a tiny mushroom.
 
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In the last several years I have photographed mostly wildlife, although I still do on occasion photograph nature and landscape images. For me, wildlife, especially in action, is a challenge and I love that and I love being outside in beautiful natural settings. I am compelled to take photographs and I see the possibilities all around me daily, even though I may not take the photograph.

I'll often set a goal when I go on a trip, based on a specific animal or setting. Setting a goal continues the challenge for me. Perhaps setting a goal that you have not attained may help to inspire you?

We all have down times and, as someone else said, maybe some time off to contemplate might help, too. Only you can determine why you want to be a photographer and what might inspire you to keep interested in photography so maybe a bit of soul searching is in order.

I often read the history of photography, in particular, the California history (I live in Northern CA) that includes Ansel Adams and the f/64 group and that always inspires me to try harder to attain new heights in my photography. That group of people worked so very hard to make the public see photography as the art it is and I appreciate what they did for photography in general. Perhaps reading the history of photography in your area would help to motivate you?

Photography for me is a passion and my life revolves around it so I try to keep that passion going in many ways, reading, travel, new ideas, etc.
You might know of this site: Internet Archive.
I sometimes spend time on the site looking at old photos. It's free but requires you 'sign up'.
 
Encouraging to know it only took five years to fix itself. Not relevant for my condition as I am booked in for a body transplant in 2027.
PS I got two photos of King Parrots today. Three birds turned up so I travelled over 4m onto the deck to take pictures. Light was not good and the reds of the male are always difficult.

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Used a 2x converter on the 100-400 zoom, distance was about 3m maybe less.
You're a lucky man, Bob. All my birds are dull bown except my bluejay friend and male house finches with their touch of red. But I do enjoy the bluejay, who plays me for peanuts like a fiddle.
 
Thanks for the reply. I have not taken many photos recently. It's winter here, had a few health problems, and been doing other stuff. I thought about it and decided I was taking photos of the same thing. I guess the photos of the Scaly breasted lorikeets was a bit different in that they had a few abnormalities.
Seems to me there is a difference between 'why' and 'purpose' is relevant but I might be wrong.
Why do you take photos?
I like to take photos because I am a nature lover and I have a big passion for wildlife. Through, my photos I wanted the public to see the beauty of wildlife and the fragility of the ecosystem. I wanted people to see like me, that animals are no different from us, they look after their young, they work hard for their survival and to protect their young and they have emotion. I do a lot of educational expositions with my photos that tell stories not only of the struggle and survival of species but also of love, affection and joy that I get the privilege to witness in their life.
I also like to take photos for my personnel joy, when I am feeling down specially with what is going on on this planet, photos or videos of wildlife always put smile on my face and remind me how life is beautiful and how this nature is generous and full of miracle, that I have to do everything I can to protect.
 
My purpose for taking photos has and continues to be a means to capture and relive memories. We travel extensively and continue to enjoy the process of taking photos while also enjoying the sights, people, food, animals and cultures. As a means to relive those memories we also make books, over 50 so far, that allow us to experience them again and again. It also is a way for us to share our experiences with friends and relatives without imposing on them with thousands of photos. They can sit and scan our work or not and I am not offended.
With the advent of digital and programs such as LRC or PS our creativity has expanded beyond just capturing a photo but added another creative layer that gives me great satisfaction as well as challenging moments. For me photography has expanded my knowledge base as well as challenged me creatively well beyond just taking photos. It is always stimulating my mind and adding a "what if component" that forces me to think well beyond just taking a photo.
So, photography for me is not just snapping a photo at the right aperture, shutter speed, ISO or anything else - it is about capturing a moment in time to be able to be relived many times. Photograpy for me is all about the memories they evoke!
 
I've heard the question many times, why do you take photos?? I usually reply by saying something like why do painters paint, why do sculptors sculpt, etc. etc.?

I almost exclusively pursue nature photography and that often involves traveling to beautiful areas and doing lots of driving around and hiking. I sometimes wonder which I like more, the travel, the sightseeing, the hiking, or the photography. I suppose I like to do all of those things and they all complement each other.

One other thing that I've noticed is I seem to have more appreciation for nature, scenery, etc. after taking up photography; the act of producing a good photo requires one to slow down and enjoy what is in front of you as you determine the best perspective, angle, what details to include and which to exclude, etc.
 
Thanks for the reply. I have not taken many photos recently. It's winter here, had a few health problems, and been doing other stuff. I thought about it and decided I was taking photos of the same thing. I guess the photos of the Scaly breasted lorikeets was a bit different in that they had a few abnormalities.
Seems to me there is a difference between 'why' and 'purpose' is relevant but I might be wrong.
Why do you take photos?
Robert,
I was reallly into photography in college and immediately thereafter. I took weddings, portraits, groups, and a little nature. I got tired of the “people” part and decided to basically use a point and shoot camera for family and vacations. The D700 I bought I never took out of auto mode…what a waste. For the past few years I have used an iPhone for a lot of pics as I usually share with family and close friend. When I retired and Nikon introduced the Z8 I decided I wanted to get back into photography. I now live on a lake and have a lot of wildlife at my fingertips. So now I do this to capture the beauty of the wildlife in my area and to enjoy being among God’s creatures, big and small. Every day is a learning experience and I am really enjoying each one as much as I can. If photography is no longer your thing, find something that is. Life is too short not to find joy in each and every moment we are given. That’s my “why” for what it’s worth.
 
Thanks for the post. Lot of good ideas.
I'm off to Darwin in a few weeks. More trips up Buffalo Creek chasing kingfishers. Hopefully opportunities to photograph other birds. I was last there December to early February of this year. Had a few back problems but nothing drastic. Two months ago my lower back decided to slow me down. Seems I have osteoarthritis. Doc says it can't be fixed just controlled. It's a pain in the back. Limits what I can do. Still mobile but have to take care. No big deal, for a geriatric I am doing good, and a bad back is not something to moan about. Occasionally I do get into grumpy old man mode. Apologies for that.
Hope you are able to manage the pain, Robert. Best wishes for good pain management.
 
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